Category: Home

Removing Kitchen Doors And Replacing It With a Beaded Curtain

It is always fun to slither through a beaded curtain. I have never yet seen a kitchen door that somehow or other didn’t get in the way of traffic or really closed in the smell of liver and onions or boiled cabbage. My solution is to remove the kitchen door and sent it to exile. You can easily start the removal of the door from your kitchen by looking at blinds and curtains for all budgets that way you get to plan your budget more effectively in this whole process.

To get the door off the hinges, you have to remove the pins first. Take your hammer and screwdriver. Nudge the screwdriver blade under the lip of the pin on the upper hinge. Hammer upward until the pin moves only partway up. Repeat on the bottom hinge but keep going until the pin lifts out completely. Go back to the top hinge and finish off. This procedure keeps the door from possibly falling on your head.

Lift the door off and be rid of it. Isn’t that a breeze? Well, not quite. Hinges are the big inheritors of sloppy paint jobs. If you’re faced with being unable to find a lip to pound, dig out the paint remover and a cheap water-color brush. Paint the sore spots with the remover to loosen the paint enough to get the pinout. Sometimes, the paint is so thick that you can chip it off rather than resort to painting remover.

If the leftover hinge parts on the door frame bug you, remove them, plug up the holes with any of the fillers you have on hand, and paint. Actually, when you hang the curtains, these hinge parts don’t show that much and only an enemy will notice or say so.

Now, to the beaded curtain itself. If you are worried about your mental state, you could string one yourself, but it’s preferable and faster to buy one. Assembled or strung as you buy them, they are the costume jewelry of your home. You can buy a curtain that is available in varying lengths and widths that has a tape with rings on the top to hang from a round rod. Or you can buy the individual strands, available by the yard, to be cut with scissors to the desired length. The latter slide into a slotted rod bought at the same time. The density is determined by how many strands you wish to hang.

I bought two styles of the crystal version, faceted and round, and alternated them. I put up the slotted rod, then took two lengths side by side, ran them in the slot, cut off at the sill and repeated until I had filled the rod. To figure out what you need for either type, measure the opening and go on from there. Allow extra inches if you want the curtain to go above or wider than the opening. With the individual strands, the manufacturer gives a measurement conversion table for various densities.

What Is the Average Cost for Homeowner’s Insurance?

One of the first things most people consider before buying a house is the cost of homeowner’s insurance. After all, your mortgage is only the tip of the iceberg. You’ve also got to pay for maintenance, taxes, homeowner’s association fees, and the dreaded insurance.

National Averages for Homeowner’s Insurance

The average cost for homeowner’s insurance on a national level was $674.23 in December 2010, according to HomeInsurance.com. Keep in mind, however, that the numbers change on a regular basis.  If you know about all the factors that are necessary to calculate house insurance then you can do this on your own as well. There is https://www.410injury.com/ that can help you with along with some of the best tips for house owners to reduce their insurance premiums.

State Averages for Homeowner’s Insurance

The real question, though, is what is the average cost for homeowner’s insurance in your particular state. The answer can vary widely. For example, the average in Missouri is a whopping $911, while Maine residents pay an average premium of only $461. The more specific you get, the more accurate your estimations will be.

You might be surprised by the average cost for homeowner’s insurance in your state. I thought that California would be right up there in the highest averages, but in reality, it’s only $788, which is lower even than Texas’s average at $878. Then you’ve got Idaho, whose average is just over $350.

It also helps to look at the trends for the average cost for homeowner’s insurance. Some states, such as Texas and Connecticut, are decreasing as the months go on, while states like Georgia and Nevada are increasing their rates.

Other Factors to Consider

Although the average cost for homeowner’s insurance in your state might help you get an idea for what you’ll pay, your actual premium may be much higher or lower than that average. Other factors come into play, and you can’t rely on estimates based on generic data.

For example, if you buy a house in a flood plain, you’re probably going to pay quite a bit more for homeowner’s insurance. The same is true if you live in an area where tornadoes, hurricanes, tsunamis, earthquakes or wildfires are likely to become a problem.

And don’t discount the characteristics of the home you eventually purchase. How old is it? Has it been inspected? Are the appliances up-to-date? What about the plumbing and electrical wiring?

You might want to buy a home where you will have to pay more in homeowner’s insurance, but where the taxes aren’t quite as high as other areas. Remember that the costs of homeownership can balance out, so try to look at the big picture rather than using just one factor to make your decision.

Don’t even consider putting in an offer on a home until you talk to your insurance agent. You might be able to better choose between different candidates if you know how much you’ll be paying in annual premiums.

Pay as You Stay: Go Home for the Holidays or Pay Extra

The college experience is supposed to be the best four years of the student’s life. One aspect of that life is living away from home in the school’s dormitory and working to support his or her self. For most freshmen, the holiday time is a chance to go home a visiting family and for sophomores, juniors, and seniors the need to go home isn’t as vital as it was when they were freshmen because being in their second, third and fourth year many have jobs.

The holiday dismisses classes and posses the opportunity for the student to work extra hours at their part-time job. Unfortunately, many colleges and universities compel their students to move off-campus for the holidays forcing them to resign on the job they acquired during the school year and that is what happened to one student attending Philadelphia’s Art Institute.

Think about it, tuition at the average college or university is around $20,000 plus. Those monies in part cover the room amp; board; the same room amp; board schools are making students leave against their will for holidays such as Christmas and Spring Break. According to an admissions worker for Philadelphia’s Art Institute if a student would like to continue housing at the dormitory during the holidays he or she must pay extra money until the new semester commences. Additionally, there are several service providers that offer you the best teaching services. They have tutors that will provide you online guidance, which makes it really easier for you to move back home. 

Speaking to many of the city students the idea is ridiculous because leaving campus for holidays should be a choice they should make. Demanding students leave for the holidays causes them to lose jobs which in turn they lose the valuable money that they need to support themselves while being away from home.

The money students are loosing is valuable especially to those who do not have wealthy parents or government assistance through financial aid. Books go from anywhere between $50-$120 and not to mention meals. Unlike the college I went to, Georgia State University, Philadelphia’s Art Institute does not offer a meal plan. Some neighboring restaurants offer discounts to students but how are students to afford food with no money?

Colleges and universities expect a student to shell out $20,000 plus for tuition and in the same breath kick the students out of the housing they are rightfully paying for the two to three weeks that school is out of session for Christmas break. The schools also expect the students to basically walk-off jobs they searched for and worked to keep in hopes of returning to those jobs after the holidays. Fact is most businesses slow after the holidays so the chances of the students being re-employed are slim to none especially if he or she quit due to being compulsory kicked off-campus.

Not too many students can afford to live off-campus especially attending schools in big cities such as Philadelphia, New York, Atlanta and California where the rent is outrageous. These students can barley buy food and purchase books by working minimal hours at a part-time job now let alone pay rent.

Forcing students to use their desperately earned money just to stay in a dormitory they are already paying for intuition is outlandish and colleges and universities need to consider what they are doing to students. These students come from all across the country in hopes to acquire knowledge and they wreck their developing minds studying and working part-time at the same time only to be either kicked off campus or forced to pay to stay. I think colleges and universities need to get back to the realization that they are there for the students and not for the students’ money.

Who’s to say every student has the luxury to afford to go home every holiday? Who’s to say some students even want to go home? Who’s to say a student is allowed to go home. Schools are not considering various living and family conditions when they enforce the go home or pay as you stay an idea when they really should be.

Landscaping Your Home for Sale – Is it useful or not?

Landscaping your home to prepare it for sale is different than landscaping a home you plan to live in. There are several things to keep in mind. First of all, less is more. It is not necessary or even prudent to invest in massive landscaping designs on a home you will not be living in. The purpose of landscaping a home for sale is to appeal to the broadest base of potential buyers as possible. It is not to reflect your own style or make a personal statement about your tastes. Your goal is to give eye appeal to your property, not to see how many plants and sculptures you can fit into any given space. The design you select should be something a potential buyer will regard as easy to care for, and not a design that will require constant work and maintenance.

From strictly a financial standpoint, it is better to spend as little as possible in order to achieve a pleasing look for the property you are selling. While it may be tempting to buy a lot of trees, shrubs, and plants, keep in mind you are aiming just for a certain look. Quantity does not substitute for quality. In fact, it’s all too easy to get carried away and then all you achieve is a look of disorganized clutter, something that has little appeal to most homebuyers. When planning your landscaping, keep it simple and clean.

In order to appeal to as many buyers as possible, stick to common-sense basics like trimmed edges, spare designs, clean lines, and low-maintenance layouts. Buyers can always add plants and features once they own the home. Different and attractive designs can be used at Pasir Ris Central showflat for landscaping of the house. The prices will depend on the layout of the flat.

If you already have some landscaping in place, the first step is to clean it up. Trim bushes and shrubs, clear landscaped areas of debris like fallen leaves and weeds. Use a trimmer or edger to produce clean lines on the perimeter of your yard, along any walkways, and around your flowerbeds. Fill in any bare spots in the lawn with fast growing grass seed. Make certain your porches are in good condition, make any necessary repairs, paint or carpet the surfaces if they are dull or damaged. These steps alone will improve the general impression of your property.

If you have a well-placed tree in your yard, there is a quick way to add some charm. Simply circle it in bricks or pretty stone. Be sure and lay down black weed barrier first. Then fill in the circle with decorative mulch, such as red or brown wood chips. The cost is minimal in comparison to the finished effect. If you have a bare exterior wall, consider putting in a few well spaced plants and fill in with decorative mulch. Maybe place a simple row of patio bricks or stones in front.

In summary, there is no need to spend a fortune preparing the exterior of your home for sale. Think clean, simple and low maintenance.